West and Central African Art: Unambiguous Discourse Opening Reception: Thursday November 20, 5:00PM-9:00PM Tobya Art Gallery: 2929 Rainier Ave S. Se

     
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West and Central African Art: Unambiguous Discourse

Opening Reception: Thursday November 20, 5:00PM-9:00PM

Tobya Art Gallery: 2929 Rainier Ave S. Seattle, WA 98144

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I am pleased to announce the forthcoming Exhibition- West and Central African Art: Unambiguous Discourse. The exhibition presents a collection of two and three-dimensional art works- textiles, masks, sculptures, bronze casting, terracotta, and metal art from West and Central Africa. The collection includes works from- Mali, Ivory Coast, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Nigeria, Benin, Gabon, Togo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cameron and Guinea.

Featured in this show, the collection of mask represents a wide variety of regional styles of West and Central Africa. The masks are unique to the respective culture signified. In some occasions, masks of West and Central Africa have similarity in form and feature. And this similarity is true across contemporary boarders. However, most masks of the region, West and Central Africa, vary greatly in form, style as well as significance. For example, the Ba-Kuba Mask form Democratic Republic of Congo(image bellow the most right) is life size and curved from softwood. To create the desired effect, the Kuba artist used mixed media- textile, raffia, beads, nails, pins, copper sheet, and cowrie shells. On the other hand, the larger than life mask from the same region,(image to the right) Democratic Republic of Congo, is made only with softwood with stripes defined by tan and brownish-red pigment and striations that separates color patterns.

The second group represented in this exhibit is sculpture. This group consists West African wood and bronze statues including the Baule- Ivory Coast, Bambera and Dagon –Mali, Yoruba- Nigeria, Ashanti- Ghana as well as different regions of Benin, Burkina Fasso, and Guinea. As it is with the masks, there is a great distinction among each piece in style and form. While the Baule statues have a polished and smooth surface and incorporate details like scarification and prominent hairstyle of the subject, the Dagon statues are portrayed in a manner that gives less emphasis to the finish or details like scarification and hairstyle.

The last but as equally important group represented in this exhibit is the pottery and bronze castings collection. The Dogon Equestrian Figures of Mali as well as the magnificent Bronze Casting from Benin are the highlight of this exhibit.

This show is planned and organized hastily because of limitations. However, I am happy to be able to present it in an intimate setting that would allow a one-to-one dialogue with the viewer. I believe this is a great exhibition that presents a collection of over sixty pieces of original art. I would like to invite you all to this event that shows magnificent pieces by the wondrous masters of form and imaginations from West and Central Africa.

Curator,
Admassu Addisu
Tobya Art Gallery
www.TobyaArtGallery.com
info@tobyaartgallery.com

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