OPHTHALMOLOGY CASE OF THE MONTH Pigment spot in a dog’s eye This case of the month has been prepared by Robin Stanley & Chloe Hardman of Animal Eye

OPHTHALMOLOGY CASE OF THE MONTH

Pigment spot in a dog’s eye

This case of the month has been prepared by Robin Stanley & Chloe Hardman of Animal Eye Care.

A 10 year old Australian Cattle Dog has been presented for vision loss, during your examination you note cataracts and a pigmented lesion in the left eye. This pigmented lesion sits between the iris and the cornea, it is spherical and moves when the eye moves.

iriscyst1

What do you see?

List possible causes for cataracts

What could the pigmented mass be?

What diagnostic tests could you consider?

What treatment options are available?

What do you see?

Dilated pupil. Mature cataract. Spherical heavily pigmented mass sitting in the ventral anterior chamber.

List possible causes for cataracts

1. Inherited cataracts in ACDs
2. Secondary to PRA – progressive retinal atrophy*
3. Diabetes

Most common cause of cataracts in ACDs seen at Animal Eye Care

What could the pigmented mass be?

1. Iris cyst
2. Iris tumour

What diagnostic tests could you consider?

Focal light examination or Slit lamp examination. You can transilluminate an iris cyst with a bright light.
High definition ultrasound, iris cysts are hollow, whereas iris tumours are solid

What treatment options are available?

Most iris cysts do not cause any problems at all, so no treatment is needed. In Great Danes there is a problem where multiple iris cysts can form and they can push the iris forward and end up causing glaucoma. In these cases these small cysts can be aspirated by a small needle into the anterior chamber.

In some cases where the owners have been concerned we have also zapped these iris cysts using the Diode Laser. Under sedation the Diode laser beam is aimed onto the cyst, a short burst of laser energy is delivered and the cyst is ruptured and collapses in the ventral drainage angle.

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